Innovations Expected To Make Driving A Worthy Experience

BY JACKIE EDWARDS

The demand for automotive engineers was set to rise by 18700 in 2018, according to a survey by the Recruiter. This is not a shocking statistic considering that the automotive industry is one of the greatest markets in the world. The constant application of science to daily life in the form of innovations like machine learning is once again showing up in the manufacturing of cars. Cars are getting sleeker, more intelligent, and highly accommodating with each update. New innovations continue to improve the driving experience now and for the future.

Autonomous Vehicles

Also called self-driving cars, autonomous vehicles are finally here after decades of research and test drives. A self-driving car means you can have a hands-off experience on the highway. With the latest car diagnostic tools, it is only fair you have the best car to test them on. The level 3 automated driving Audi A8 is just the first of many. The science behind this amazing feature is a combination of sonar, GPS, radar, laser scanners, odometry, Lidar, and inertial measuring units. A combination of these features ensures that the car senses its environment, including the road structure, other road users, and approaching cars to adjust its speed. It may be a while before these cars are allowed on roads without a driver though.

Biometric Vehicle Access

Gone are the days when a key could help you access your car, and so are the days when you could break into a car using a hanger. The existing radio frequency key fob technology is awesome, but biometric vehicle access is even cooler. During its launch in the 2018 North American Auto Show, the Nissan XMotion showcased its fingerprint scanner that opens the door. Your car basically starts when you touch it. Biometric technology is already used in connected cars, and will be seen in more mainstream and futuristic cars in the coming years.

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The History of 3D Printing

by Megan Ray Nichols 

3D printing has taken the world by storm in the last decade, but the technology isn’t as new as you might think. Believe it or not, the idea behind that desktop-sized 3D printer in your shop dates back to the 1980s. Let’s take a closer look at the history of 3D printing and where it might go in the future.

The 1980s — The Birth of 3D Printing

The first attempt at creating a 3D printer occurred in 1980. Dr. Hideo Kodama filed a patent in May of that year. This new 3D printer relied on photopolymer materials — liquids that could be printed, then exposed to light to harden into plastic. While this plan does sound like a viable one, Kodama never commercialized the design, and the 3D printing industry seemed dead on arrival.

In 1986, Chuck Hull invented the SLA-1 — the world’s first 3D printer that could build objects one layer at a time. In this case, the SLA-1 used lasers to cause selected chains of molecules to link together, forming plastics or polymers. The next year, Carl Deckard of the University of Texas came up with a different type of 3D printing — Selective Laser Sintering, or SLS. Deckard’s machine built an object out of layers of powder, then used lasers to melt the powder, hardening it into the finished plastic.

In 1989, S. Scott and Lisa Crump, a married pair of inventors, came up with the 3D printing technology that we know today — fused deposition modeling. The machine would melt a polymer filament and deposit it onto a substrate layer by layer until it finished the design.

3D printing had officially been born, but these early models lacked something — an easy and user-friendly way to design things for printing.

The 1990s — Computer-Aided Design

Designing something for a 3D printer might seem easy now, but imagine doing it without a CAD program at your fingertips. That’s what the early 3D designers had to do — create plans to build their objects without the assistance of a computer-aided design program. Commercial CAD programs became more readily available throughout the 1990s, though purchasing a 3D printer was still often too expensive for the home inventor.

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7 Problems with Scientific Translation

Erica Sunarjo

All over the world, scientists are conducting groundbreaking research, writing compelling papers, and educating people on a variety of topics. Everyone benefits when scientific information is disseminated across the Globe. Of course, not all scientists speak the same language. As a result, scientific documentation, texts, research notes, and other materials must be translated, so they are available to anyone who can benefit from them.

Thankfully, there are services that offer scientific translation and localization.  However, the process is not always as simple as one might assume. If translation professionals don’t take special care, mistakes can happen. Here are 7 problems with scientific translations that both translators and members of the scientific community must be aware of.

Lack of Translator Expertise

Scientific and technical translations can cover an exceptionally wide range of industries and academic disciplines. Some of these are quite advanced. Others are simply unique and require very specific skills and background to understand. It can be difficult to find translators with the right expertise to execute accurate and certifiable translations. People who need such translations struggle to find qualified translation professionals and often fail to get final translations that are accurate.

In these situations, translation services and their clients must take extra steps to ensure accuracy. This might include having subject matter experts in addition to translation professionals verify documents, provide needed details, and assist those involved in the product to ensure accuracy.

Unclear Source Documents

Even scientific documents can contain idioms, jargon, and phraseology that can make translation challenging. In addition to this, scientific workers and researchers may use different words and phrases to reference scientific and clinical terms. There’s also the issue of false friends. These are words that sound very similar in two languages but are actually distinct. This can be further confused by the fact that in scientific research many false friends have some similarities. Something as simple as the term ‘medical device’ can cause refusing results due to the false friends phenomenon.

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